In Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, how does Clarissa's domestic and maternal status provide her with comfort?

In Mrs. Dalloway, Clarissa's upper-middle-class life allows her the comforts of respectability, routine, and socialization, all of which allow her to avoid painful thoughts of mortality.

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Clarissa's status as a respectable, upper-middle-class wife provides her with a fair degree of stability in her everyday life. On the outside, everything appears perfectly normal; Clarissa leads a charmed life full of friends, parties, and regular shopping expeditions.

Yet given that Mrs. Dalloway is a paradigm example of literary...

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Clarissa's status as a respectable, upper-middle-class wife provides her with a fair degree of stability in her everyday life. On the outside, everything appears perfectly normal; Clarissa leads a charmed life full of friends, parties, and regular shopping expeditions.

Yet given that Mrs. Dalloway is a paradigm example of literary modernism, there's a whole lot more going on beneath the glittering surface. Clarissa is a complex woman, with a rich interior life that is expressed at various points in the story by way of stream-of-consciousness narration, a literary technique that gives readers privileged access to a character's innermost thoughts and emotions.

Nevertheless, Clarissa is able to use her respectable domestic and marital life as a means of keeping her deepest emotions in check. So long as Clarissa can hide behind the façade she presents to the world then she will be saved from the terrible fate of being a slave to her emotions. Although this is not necessarily the life she would choose to lead, it does have its compensations. For one thing, keeping active and immersing herself in a continual series of social gatherings allows Clarissa to stave off, however briefly, thoughts of her own mortality, which in her quiet moments cause her considerable anguish.

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