In "Two Kinds," why are "Pleading Child" and "Perfectly Contented" referred to as two halves of the same song?

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We have a tendency to expect the most out of those whom we love the most, and we can be much harder on our loved ones than we are on the general population. That is part of what the Jing-mei realizes in her more mature adulthood as she reflects back on the experience of the piano with her mother.

Jing-mei's mother believes that her daughter is capable of greatness—as much as the other talented children she reads about in Reader's Digest or watches on the Ed Sullivan Show. Finally, she decides to focus her efforts on developing her daughter's piano talents.

Jing-mei is not a willing participant; she is determined not to let her mother "change" her. So she halfheartedly attends lessons, taking advantage of the fact that her piano teacher had neither great hearing nor good sight. It almost becomes a game to her to see how much she can get away with.

Her mother—and the entire audience—realizes the truth at her recital, and afterward when her mother tries to send her back to piano lessons,...

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