In Tuck Everlasting, why does the man in the yellow suit go to the Fosters? What does the constable's remark about the gallows seem to predict for the Tucks?  

The man in the yellow suit goes to the Fosters to get them to sign over their ownership of the woods. He tells them that he knows where Winnie is but won't give up that information if they don't give him the woods. The constable's remark about the gallows predicts that one of the Tucks might end up being sentenced to death.

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The man in the yellow suit is our antagonist in this story. He initially goes to the Fosters to try and glean information about the magical spring in the woods owned by the Fosters, which gives anyone who drinks water from it immortality.

Later, after following Winnie and the Tucks in the aftermath of Winnie's "kidnapping" and overhearing everything the Tucks tell her, he goes back to the Fosters' home, this time to blackmail them. He informs them that he knows their daughter's whereabouts, and will return her to them in exchange for ownership of the woods. This, of course, would give him ownership of the magic spring. His luck runs out, however, when he shows up at the Tuck's home to "collect" Winnie.

The constable's comment about the gallows seems to imply that Mae Tuck will receive a death sentence and is destined for the gallows. This puts the Tuck family back in the same predicament that the man in the yellow suit put them in—their secret is at risk of getting out. Mae Tuck will simply not die if placed in the gallows, which will lead to the realization that she is immortal and all the questions that will naturally come with that.

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The man in the yellow suit goes to the Fosters to gain control over the spring. He is an outsider who had become obsessed with the idea of the magic spring from his childhood visits to the area, where his grandmother lived. He believes that the Tucks have gained longevity, or even immortality, by drinking the spring water. As an adult, his goal became to possess the spring—not so he could benefit from drinking its water himself, but so he could profit from bottling and selling the water. An important step in achieving his goal to obtain legal title to the land in which the spring is located, which the Fosters own. He lurks in the woods and spies on Winnie and the Tucks.

Through his spying, he becomes the only witness to Winnie’s whereabouts when she disappears with the Tucks. The man sees this knowledge as providing him leverage for gaining legal title from the Fosters. He is willing to use an innocent girl as a pawn and to inflict psychological harm on her parents in order to advance a plan that should bring him untold riches.

The constable’s remark about the gallows serves as foreshadowing, a clue to related events that will occur later in the book. His apparent pride in this new apparatus seems to indicate that it will be used in the course of the novel. Mentioning the gallows at this pride seems to indicate that one of the Tucks might be hanged.

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The nameless man in the yellow suit is the story's main villain. He wants access to the life-giving spring because he sees it as a way to make a fortune. He is willing to trick and double cross in order to get it.

In chapter 15, the man in the yellow suit is at the Fosters' home. He tells the concerned family that he knows where Winnie is. He uses this information to get the Fosters' to sign over ownership to their woods to him. He insinuates that he won't tell them about Winnie's whereabouts unless they agree to the deal.

In the next chapter, the man in the yellow suit meets up with the constable and they head off to get Winnie back from the Tucks. The constable is a talkative man. Although the man in the yellow suit does not say much, the constable makes up for it by talking all about his long career and the new jailhouse. During this talk, he brings up the gallows. A gallows is where criminals are executed by hanging. The mention of the gallows foreshadows the coming trouble for the Tucks. When Mae kills the man in the yellow suit in chapter 19, it becomes clear that the Tucks are in a very dangerous spot. As a murderer, Mae will be sentenced to the gallows, which would certainly give away their secret.

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The man in the yellow suit goes to the Foster household to blackmail them.  The Fosters know that Winnie is missing.  They do not know if she has run away or been kidnapped.  The man in the yellow suit goes to the Foster home to tell them that he knows where Winnie is and who has her.  The Fosters are immediately relieved that this seeming good Samaritan is willing to help them out; however, they quickly discover that the man in the yellow suit has a hidden agenda.  He wants to own the woods that the Foster family owns.  He will tell them where Winnie is, if they give him the woods in return.  

"I've got what you want, and you've got what I want. Of course, you might find that child without me, but . . . you might not find her in time. So: I want the wood and you want the child. It's a trade. A simple, clear-cut trade."

The Fosters agree to the trade, and the constable is immediately brought into the situation.  

The man in the yellow suit and the constable both begin riding toward the Tuck home.  The constable is a talkative man, and so he begins trying to strike up a conversation with the man in the yellow suit.  At one point, the constable mentions the gallows.  

"'Course, we got a gallows of our own, if we ever need it. Keeps down trouble, I think, just having it there. Ain't ever used it yet."

The constable's remark about the gallows foreshadows the coming trouble to the Tuck family.  The reader learns that the town has a jail and a gallows.  The gallows information is a useless extra detail, unless for some reason it will be important.  After Mae kills the man in the yellow suit, the gallows becomes a deadly important part of the story.  

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