In To Kill a Mockingbird, why does Scout describe Walter Cunningham's family life to her teacher Miss Caroline?

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While Miss Caroline perceives Scout's explanation as precociousness, Scout simply desires to help her teacher, a Maycomb outsider.  Through Scout's narration, the author has already established that Miss Caroline knows little about the traditions of Maycomb and that Scout sees this as a hindrance for her teacher.

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While Miss Caroline perceives Scout's explanation as precociousness, Scout simply desires to help her teacher, a Maycomb outsider.  Through Scout's narration, the author has already established that Miss Caroline knows little about the traditions of Maycomb and that Scout sees this as a hindrance for her teacher.

In explaining the poverty of the Cunningham family, Scout not only tries to educate her teacher, but she also mimics her father's treatment of Jem and her.  If Scout does not understand something, especially about her town, she asks her father, and he explains it to her.  He treats her as an equal; so Scout does the same with her teacher.  Her efforts, of course, are unappreciated by Miss Caroline and Walter.  Miss Caroline thinks that Scout is trying to upstage her, and the description of the Cunningham family's poverty greatly embarrasses Walter.

 

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