In To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, what does Calpurnia look like other than "angles and bones"?

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Calpurnia's physical description was mostly overlooked by the author.  There were very few descriptions about her character's appearance.  

Calpurnia often squinted her eyes because she was nearsighted.  Scout described the woman's hand as being "wide as a bed slat and twice as hard" (To Kill a Mockingbird ...

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Calpurnia's physical description was mostly overlooked by the author.  There were very few descriptions about her character's appearance.  

Calpurnia often squinted her eyes because she was nearsighted.  Scout described the woman's hand as being "wide as a bed slat and twice as hard" (To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapter 1).  Scout did not like to be on the receiving end of a spanking from Calpurnia.  

She was a tall African American woman.  Scout found Calpurnia to be graceful in a way that appeared effortless.  An example of this was when Calpurnia put on a starched apron to serve chocolates on a tray to Aunt Alexandra and her missionary circle friends.  Calpurnia had served them all as if she were a proper maid.  Calpurnia was a smart dresser at church, as well.  This was evident in the attention to detail she gave the children's clothes.  Calpurnia preferred things to look proper.

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