In The Turn of the Screw, who does the governess say sees Miss Jessel in the garden?

The governess says that both she and Flora see Miss Jessel's ghost in the garden. The governess notes that Flora sees the ghost but says nothing. This is important because the governess realizes that the children are accustomed to seeing the ghosts but have said nothing about them to the adults because they do not fear the apparitions. In fact, the children are in communication with the ghosts, as the governess realizes in this scene.

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The governess says that Flora sees Miss Jessel in the garden. The governess is with Flora, strolling through the garden on a quiet walk and enjoying the beauty of the garden in the English countryside. The governess sees the ghost of Miss Jessel appear in the garden. Much to her...

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The governess says that Flora sees Miss Jessel in the garden. The governess is with Flora, strolling through the garden on a quiet walk and enjoying the beauty of the garden in the English countryside. The governess sees the ghost of Miss Jessel appear in the garden. Much to her surprise and dismay, she realizes that Flora also sees Miss Jessel’s ghost in the garden.

The importance of this scene is that it alerts the governess to the fact that the children each see the ghosts but have said nothing about them to the adults. This means that the children do not fear the apparitions and, as the governess discovers to her horror, are in communication with them.

The governess immediately goes to Mrs. Grose to tell her what she has learned about Flora. She says that Flora was about ten yards away from her when the ghost first appeared. The governess held her breath while she waited for Flora to shout out in terror and alarm. However, Flora was not alarmed by Miss Jessel’s ghost and the governess understands that it is because Flora is accustomed to seeing the apparition and does not fear it.

The governess immediately finds Mrs. Grose to tell her about the children:

They know—it’s too monstrous: they know, they know!

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