In The Stranger, what kind of weather forms the setting for the murder?

The hot weather forms the setting for the murder at the climax of The Stranger.

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The weather is hot when Mersault murders the Arab. This heat is not of the ordinary, pleasant summer's day variety, but entirely miserable. Mersault is made dizzy by this heat, suggesting it affects his faculties in some slight way. He is also temporarily blinded by the sun, which is extremely...

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The weather is hot when Mersault murders the Arab. This heat is not of the ordinary, pleasant summer's day variety, but entirely miserable. Mersault is made dizzy by this heat, suggesting it affects his faculties in some slight way. He is also temporarily blinded by the sun, which is extremely bright in the sky when he commits the murder. The text itself even describes the sun and its great heat as "inhuman" and "oppressive," oddly suggesting malevolence on the part of his surroundings. This reflects Mersault's feelings of displacement and alienation within the greater collective.

Throughout the novel, heat acts as an antagonistic force for Mersault. The weather is hot on the day of his mother's funeral, and the courtroom is stiflingly hot when Mersault is tried for the Arab's murder. As a result, heat becomes associated with death and the absurdity of life in general. While The Stranger largely presents the universe as indifferent, the heat is anything but since it makes Mersault suffer so. It could be suggested that this heat represents the idea that humans are not totally in control of their own behavior since the text suggests Mersault's decision to kill the Arab man was partially influenced by the intolerable heat from the sun.

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