In "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," how are each of Mitty's daydreams interrupted?

In "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," his daydream of being a military commander is interrupted by his wife demanding to know why he's driving so fast. Next, his dream of being a surgeon is interrupted by a parking attendant telling him he's in the wrong lane. His daydream of being a defendant in a murder trial is interrupted by a reference to a dog. Finally, his wife's tap on his shoulder ends his dream of being a pilot.

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If there’s one thing Walter Mitty enjoys, it’s a good daydream. His fate, however, is seemingly to never be left alone to enjoy them. When one looks at the dullness of his life and the ways in which his wife bosses him around, it’s unsurprising that he enjoys escaping into a world where he can be far, far away.

In his first daydream, which he has while driving his car with his wife next to him, he is a pilot. His wife puts an end to this by yelling at him to slow down.

In his second daydream, he is a surgeon. This time, it is the loud voice of a parking attendant that interrupts his reverie.

In his third daydream, he is on trial for murder. This is interrupted again by his wife, since he remembers that she instructed him to buy biscuits for their puppy.

In his fourth and final daydream that gets cut short, Mitty is a revered fighter pilot. This daydream is brought to an abrupt end when his wife taps him on the shoulder to ask whether he managed to get the puppy biscuits.

His final daydream—one which finally goes uninterrupted—involves being a condemned prisoner facing a firing squad.

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In "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," each of Mitty's daydreams are interrupted when reality intrudes and he needs to respond to someone or something in his dull real life, taking him away from the exciting secret life of his daydreams.

Walter Mitty is an ordinary man leading a rather dull and humdrum life. He is henpecked: his wife barks orders at him as she bids him to drive her to her hairstylist and monitors his driving speed. She chides and rebukes Mitty. She is insensitive to his feelings and is not respectful of his time. She keeps him waiting while she does her shopping and he stands outside in the rain and sleet.

Mitty escapes into the worlds of his daydreams in which he is not a henpecked mousy man. His status is exalted in his dreams. He is regarded as someone special by all around him, even in his daydream where he is on trial for murder. However, reality always intrudes on his dreams.

His first dream, where he is a pilot, is interrupted when his wife barks an order for him to slow the car down. His second dream of being a surgeon is interrupted when a parking attendant barks orders at him. His third dream of being the defendant in a murder trial is interrupted when he recalls an order from his wife to buy puppy biscuits. His fourth dream is interrupted when his wife barks at him.

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All but one of Walter Mitty's daydreams are interrupted. The last daydream in the story, in which he's a condemned prisoner in front of a firing squad, isn't interrupted at all.

In the first daydream, Mitty imagines himself to be an heroic military commander. This dream comes to an abrupt end when his wife demands to know why he's driving so fast.

Then, he has a dream about being a famous surgeon carrying out an operation on a millionaire banker. Mitty's reveries are interrupted by a parking attendant telling him to back up, as he's in the wrong lane.

Next, Mitty dreams that he's a defendant in a high-profile murder trial. During the trial, Mitty punches the district attorney, calling him a “miserable cur.” A cur is an old-fashioned name for a dog, and this awakens in Mitty a realization that he has to buy some puppy biscuits.

In his final interrupted daydream, Mitty is an heroic fighter pilot. This comes to a sudden end, much to Mitty's displeasure, when his wife taps him on the shoulder. She wants to know where's been and if he managed to buy the box of puppy biscuits. The stage is then set for Mitty's last daydream in which he's a condemned prisoner before a firing squad. But as we've seen, this daydream isn't interrupted.

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Mitty's first daydream is of flying a Navy plane through a terrible storm. In reality, he unconsciously begins to drive faster, and his wife startles him out of the dream, asking him why he is driving so fast.

Mitty's second daydream is of being a famous surgeon, operating on a millionaire banker. He is still driving, and he is woken by a parking attendant, who calls his attention to the fact that he is driving on the wrong side of the road.

Mitty's third daydream is of being the defendant in a famous trial,and he is woken by a mental association with dog biscuits, which his wife asked him to buy.

Mitty's fourth daydream is of being a fighter pilot in World War II, and he is again woken by his wife, who was looking for him.

Mitty's final daydream is of being a condemned man facing a firing squad, brought about by his subconscious realization that he cannot escape the drudgery of his life:

...with that faint, fleeting smile playing about his lips, he faced the firing squad; erect and motionless, proud and disdainful, Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last.
(Thurber, "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," bnrg.cs.berkeley.edu)

This is Mitty's last daydream; he does not wake up from this one before the story ends.

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