In The Scarlet Letter, which quotes help show a connection between Chillingworth and evil?

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The narrator of the book tells us in chapter 9, entitled "The Leech," about the dramatic change which Chillingworth has undergone since his arrival in Boston.

At first, his expression had been calm, meditative, scholar-like. Now, there was something ugly and evil in his face, which they had not...

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The narrator of the book tells us in chapter 9, entitled "The Leech," about the dramatic change which Chillingworth has undergone since his arrival in Boston.

At first, his expression had been calm, meditative, scholar-like. Now, there was something ugly and evil in his face, which they had not previously noticed, and which grew still the more obvious to sight, the oftener they looked upon him. According to the vulgar idea, the fire in his laboratory had been brought from the lower regions, and was fed with infernal fuel; and so, as might be expected, his visage was getting sooty with the smoke.

The narrator directly states here that Chillingworth's face has begun to seem more and more ugly and evil, and people grow increasingly aware of this impression the longer and more often they see him. There are rumors that the fire he uses in his lab—in his work as a physician—has actually been brought up from Hell below, and the soot from that hellish fire is dirtying his face and making it appear darker and more evil. Moreover,

To sum up the matter, it grew to be a widely diffused opinion, that the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale, like many other personages of especial sanctity, in all ages of the Christian world, was haunted either by Satan himself, or Satan's emissary, in the guise of old Roger Chillingworth.

So, people have come to believe that their trusted minister is being hounded by either the Devil himself or someone doing the Devil's bidding: Roger Chillingworth. This believed association between Chillingworth and the Devil is further evidence that people think he is evil.

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This first one describes Chillingworth and shows him to appear demonic in form. 

"...there came a glare of red light out of his eyes; as if the old man's soul were on fire, and kept on smoldering duskily within his breast, until, by some casual puff of passion, it was blown into a momentary flame...Chillingworth was a striking evidence of man's faculty of transforming himself into a devil, if he will only, for a reasonable space of time, undertake a devil's office".

This one is when Pearl refers to Chillingworth as "the black man", which is another term for "the devil" - and therefore connects him to evil.

--"Come away, mother! Come away, or yonder old black man will catch you! He hath got hold of the minister already. Come away, mother or he will catch you! But he cannot catch little Pearl!"

This last quote is from the narrator, who expresses that Chillingworth has been taken over by evil tendencies.

"Calm, gentle, passionless, as he appeared, there was yet, we fear, a quiet depth of malice, hitherto latent, but active now, in this unfortunate old man, which led him to imagine a more intimate revenge than any mortal had ever wreaked upon an enemy. To make himself the one trusted friend, to whom should be confided all the fear, the remorse, the agony, the ineffectual repentance, the backward rush of sinful thoughts, expelled in vain!"

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