In "The Red Convertible," what does Lyman mean by stating, "For him, it would keep on going"? Why does Lyman keep the red convertible in excellent condition while Henry is away?

In "The Red Convertible," when Lyman says that for Henry, the war would "keep on going," he means that Henry will not be able to separate himself from the horrors he has experienced at war. Forever changed and emotionally scarred, it will be as if the war had never ended for Henry. While Henry is away, Lyman keeps the convertible in good condition because it is a reminder of the happy times he shared with his brother.

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Lyman has been telling his readers about the letter exchanges happening between him and Henry. The rate of exchange isn't great, and Lyman moves on to telling readers that he simply doesn't worry about his draft number being called. Lyman then rapidly changes the subject and tells readers that it...

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Lyman has been telling his readers about the letter exchanges happening between him and Henry. The rate of exchange isn't great, and Lyman moves on to telling readers that he simply doesn't worry about his draft number being called. Lyman then rapidly changes the subject and tells readers that it was at least three years before Henry came home. Lyman says that the government had decided that the war was over, but he then gives his first hint that Henry is a different person. For Henry, the war "would keep on going." He brought it home with him. The mental and emotional scarring was something that he couldn't walk away from. The combat and horrors of war were a part of him, not something he could turn off and consider over.

In that same paragraph, Lyman tells us that he kept the car in perfect shape while Henry was at war. Henry always thought of the car as belonging to Henry, and Lyman wants to make sure it is ready for Henry the moment he comes home. The car is also symbolic of Henry himself and the good times that they had together prior to the war. By keeping the car in good condition, it forces Lyman to spend time with the car. In a way, this is how Lyman is still able to be "with" Henry. They worked on the car together. They used it together. All of those were great memories. Lyman works to keep those memories alive by working on the car.

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