In "The Red Convertible," in what particular way has Henry changed due to his experiences in the war?

In "The Red Convertible," Henry has become somber, moody, and withdrawn, due to his experiences in the war. Before serving in Vietnam, he was confident, easy-going, and funny. Lyman is not surprised when his former friends detach themselves, as he finds his brother has gotten “mean.”

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Louise Erdrich ’s story is about the experiences of two brothers, Henry and Lyman Lamartine, after the older brother, Henry, returns from Vietnam. Lyman had been too young to join up, but Henry enlisted in the Marines. Before he left to serve in the Vietnam War, Henry had been well-known...

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Louise Erdrich’s story is about the experiences of two brothers, Henry and Lyman Lamartine, after the older brother, Henry, returns from Vietnam. Lyman had been too young to join up, but Henry enlisted in the Marines. Before he left to serve in the Vietnam War, Henry had been well-known for his carefree disposition and tendency to act impulsively. An easy-going man who was rarely rattled, Henry had a good sense of humor and rarely shied from a challenge that involved a new experience. One example that Lyman, the first person narrator, gives is when the two of them set off in the car they owned together, heading for Alaska, no predetermined itinerary or fixed time period for the road trip.

When Henry returns from his tour, he is like a different person. While Lyman does not suggest a diagnosis, Henry seems to have been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Lyman finds it difficult to connect with him because Henry rarely speaks and does not discuss his experiences. His overall demeanor is mirthless, even morose. Henry is restless and uneasy. Rather than initiate jokes, he sometimes laughs uneasily, making a “choking” that others find disturbing. As his former friends drift away, Lyman is not surprised or judgmental.

They got to leaving him alone most of the time, and I didn't blame them. It was a fact: Henry was jumpy and mean.

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