In the Quran, what do verses 62, 111–113, and 285 suggest about the relationships among Jews, Christians, and Muslims?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

The verses concerning Jews and Christians are in the second and longest chapter of the Qur'an, Al-Baqarah (The Cow). Verse 2.62 says that all those who believe in the Qur'an, along with Jews, Christians, and Sabeans, will have their reward with God. They will have no cause for fear or...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

The verses concerning Jews and Christians are in the second and longest chapter of the Qur'an, Al-Baqarah (The Cow). Verse 2.62 says that all those who believe in the Qur'an, along with Jews, Christians, and Sabeans, will have their reward with God. They will have no cause for fear or grief if they behave righteously and keep the faith. This strongly suggests that the differences between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are relatively trivial. All three faiths worship the same God, and he recognizes the goodness of their intentions.

Verses 2.111–2.113, however, contain a warning about the reliability of Jewish and Christian scripture. Jews and Christians argue amongst themselves, each saying that the other is wrong. Even though they are relying on the same texts, they interpret them in different ways. However, the Qur'an asserts, in language similar to that employed in 2.62, those who submit themselves to God and do good will be rewarded by God. They will have no cause for fear or grief.

Finally, verse 2.285 links Muhammad, the final messenger of God, with previous messengers in the Jewish and Christian scriptures. All the prophets have believed in God, seeking him and his forgiveness as their final objectives. All these verses, therefore, suggest that the disputes between Jews, Christians, and Muslims are ultimately unimportant. God will decide in the end, and if they act righteously, seeking and submitting themselves to God, the followers of all three religions have nothing to fear.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team