In the poem "Where The Mind Is Without Fear," we find the poet dreaming of India as a country with independence and self-respect. Standing in the twenty-first century, do you think the poet's dreams have been fulfilled?

Standing in the twenty-first century, we can see that India has achieved Tagore's dream of freedom from British rule but has not yet entirely achieved the dream of self-respect. However, the scars of imperialism are deep, and India, though currently experiencing some setbacks, has come a remarkably long way in realizing the poet's dreams.

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Let's begin by examining Rabindranath Tagore's hopes for his country as he expresses them in "Where the Mind Is Without Fear." He begins with the hope articulated in the title and the poem's first line: namely, that people's minds may be without fear and that they may hold their heads up in confidence. He also wishes knowledge to be free—for people to have a chance at education.

Additionally, he longs for a world that is not "broken up into fragments," a world in which people are not divided. He desires a world in which people speak truth and strive toward perfection, where reason reigns rather than mechanical, unthinking habit, and where God leads people's minds into freedom and into a broad spectrum of "thought and action."

Unfortunately, while India has shaken off British rule since Tagore's time, it still does not exhibit the characteristics the poet hopes for in this poem—nor, in fact, does the rest of the world. People are still enslaved to fear: fear of poverty, fear of...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 939 words.)

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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on January 28, 2021
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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on January 28, 2021