In The Outsiders, what factors contributed to the death of Bob?

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Bob Sheldon is a poor, little, rich boy whose parents never told me "No". Whatever, he wanted, he got. If he got into trouble, his father bailed him out and had the charges dropped with his social connections. All the while, his family never gave him the love and discipline...

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Bob Sheldon is a poor, little, rich boy whose parents never told me "No". Whatever, he wanted, he got. If he got into trouble, his father bailed him out and had the charges dropped with his social connections. All the while, his family never gave him the love and discipline so desperately needed. Bob need to feel a sense of belonging, which the Socs gave him. His brutal beating of Johnny Cade gives evidence that he needs to feel strong even by hurting the weak. The free access to alcohol impaired his judgement of right and wrong. His senseless hatred of the Greasers, all just to belong to the Socs, resulted in his death.

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