In The Merchant of Venice, act 2, what is stopping Launcelot Gobbo from running away?

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Launcelot opens Act II, scene ii in an internal argument between his conscience and "the fiend at [his] elbow."  One, the fiend, is tempting him to run away, and one, his conscience, is cautioning him to remain "honest" and "scorn running with [his] heels."  He concludes with the decision to...

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Launcelot opens Act II, scene ii in an internal argument between his conscience and "the fiend at [his] elbow."  One, the fiend, is tempting him to run away, and one, his conscience, is cautioning him to remain "honest" and "scorn running with [his] heels."  He concludes with the decision to go with the fiend.  He says:

The fiend gives the more friendly counsel.  I will run, fiend!  My heels are at your command.  I will run.

But at this moment, he meets up with his father whom he recognizes, but does not recognize him.  After much convincing of Old Gobbo that he, Launcelot, is indeed his son, Launcelot reveals his plan to run away and serve Bassanio.

Bassanio enters and agrees to have Launcelot serve him, but instructs him to return to his former master and leave his service in an honest way.  And so, Launcelot does not run away, but returns to take his leave of Shylock and change a Jewish master for a Christian one.

 

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