In the last section of "Tintern Abbey," Wordsworth focuses on his sister, Dorothy. What does looking at Dorothy make him remember?

Looking at Dorothy makes Wordsworth remember his boyhood. The two siblings are very close and have shared many of the same experiences. It's only natural, then, that the poet's thoughts should turn to childhood when he looks at his sister.

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In the final section of "Tintern Abbey," Wordsworth addresses his sister, Dorothy, saying that her presence buoys up his spirits, and continuing,
My dear, dear Friend; and in thy voice I catch
The language of my former heart, and read
My former pleasures in the shooting lights
Of thy wild eyes. Oh! yet a little while
May I behold in thee what I was once,
My dear, dear Sister!

Seeing Dorothy and hearing her voice transport the poet back through the years. Just as Wordsworth sees something far more intense and spiritually fulfilling in nature than mere scenery or an attractive environment, so his sister does not merely remind him of a happy childhood, but of an entirely different type of existence. In Dorothy, he sees and remembers who he used to be and what he used to love.

Being with his sister, like being in the midst of and paying attention to nature, strips away the layers of falsehood and unhappiness which accumulate through adult life lived in towns and cities. Wordsworth characterizes...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 867 words.)

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