In the last section of "Tintern Abbey," Wordsworth focuses on his sister, Dorothy. What does looking at Dorothy make him remember?

Looking at Dorothy makes Wordsworth remember his boyhood. The two siblings are very close and have shared many of the same experiences. It's only natural, then, that the poet's thoughts should turn to childhood when he looks at his sister.

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In the final section of "Tintern Abbey," Wordsworth addresses his sister, Dorothy, saying that her presence buoys up his spirits, and continuing,
My dear, dear Friend; and in thy voice I catch
The language of my former heart, and read
My former pleasures in the shooting lights
Of thy wild...

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In the final section of "Tintern Abbey," Wordsworth addresses his sister, Dorothy, saying that her presence buoys up his spirits, and continuing,
My dear, dear Friend; and in thy voice I catch
The language of my former heart, and read
My former pleasures in the shooting lights
Of thy wild eyes. Oh! yet a little while
May I behold in thee what I was once,
My dear, dear Sister!

Seeing Dorothy and hearing her voice transport the poet back through the years. Just as Wordsworth sees something far more intense and spiritually fulfilling in nature than mere scenery or an attractive environment, so his sister does not merely remind him of a happy childhood, but of an entirely different type of existence. In Dorothy, he sees and remembers who he used to be and what he used to love.

Being with his sister, like being in the midst of and paying attention to nature, strips away the layers of falsehood and unhappiness which accumulate through adult life lived in towns and cities. Wordsworth characterizes this inauthentic life with phrases such as "the sneers of selfish men" and "greetings where no kindness is." Dorothy, therefore, does not only lead him to recall the past, but to remember what really matters in the present. He hopes that if his sister's life ever takes a turn for the worse, he will be able to do something similar for her:

If solitude, or fear, or pain, or grief,
Should be thy portion, with what healing thoughts
Of tender joy wilt thou remember me,
And these my exhortations!
Having shared a joyful childhood, brother and sister are to each other a perpetual reminder of what they experienced and of the fact that joy is possible and can be recaptured.
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The speaker of “Tintern Abbey”, who is, of course, the poet Wordsworth, may have changed since his last excursion to this part of the world; but he still remembers and cherishes his childhood years. To a large extent, this is due to the presence of his beloved sister Dorothy, who has been by his side for virtually all of his life and who was his companion when he was a young boy.

In the face of his “dear, dear Sister” and “dear, dear Friend,” Wordsworth beholds what he used to be all those years ago. He may well have grown up and may no longer behold the natural world as he once did now that he's more mature and reflective, but so long as Dorothy is by his side, he will always have a connection to his golden childhood years.

Having identified Dorothy with his childhood, he wants her to experience the same kind of childlike wonder at the sight of nature that he enjoyed as a child and which still inspires him to feel the spirit that “rolls through all things.” Effectively, he wants Dorothy to remain in a state of childhood with regards to nature, as it will enable her to provide her brother with the living connection to his past that he wishes to maintain.

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The speaker of Wordsworth's poem "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" reminisces about his younger days while looking upon his sister; at the same time, he reflects on the trueness of Nature, who "never did betray / The heart that loved her." In these moments, the speaker remembers that he himself held dear his time in nature, when he wandered the woods and the cliffs and "this green pastoral landscape" and found great spiritual reward. Together, the speaker and his sister have shared time next to wild streams, for example, and the speaker explains that time in nature with his sister made his worship of Nature even more meaningful. Seeing his sister now reminds him both of their time together and of her ability to inspire in him a deeper appreciation of the natural world.

As a Romantic poet, Wordsworth revered nature and experiences of the sublime. In addition, childhood was particularly special to the Romantics, and Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy shared the experience of childhood together. All of these themes come together in this poem to make for a deeply personal reflection on life and family.

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In this famous reflection on the delights of nature and how nature is capable of being the balm to our exhausted beings, Wordsworth focuses on his sister Dorothy, who is with him on his walk as he views the beauties of the countryside before him. Note the answer to your question that the poet gives:

My dear, dear Friend; and in thy voice I catch

The language of my former heart, and read

My former pleasures in the shooting lights

Of thy wild eyes. Oh! yet a little while

May I behold in thee what I was once...

Thus we can see that looking at his sister and her "wild eyes" makes him remember the way that he was before in his passionate youth and how he regarded nature then, which is something that he had already covered before earlier on in the poem. Regarding his sister thus helps him to recall how he was once, which emphasises how much he has changed in the interim.

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