In "The Fall of the House of Usher," which descriptive details of the interior of the house suggest that the narrator has entered a realm that is very different from the ordinary world?

In "The Fall of the House of Usher," there are numerous descriptive details of the interior of the house that suggests that the narrator has entered a realm very different from the ordinary world, such as Gothic archway of the hall, which suggests a place that's dark and scary. Then there are the "sombre tapestries" on the wall and the "phantasmagoric" armorial trophies that rattle as the narrator strides past.

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Before the narrator of "The Fall of the House of Usher" has even set foot inside the place, it's clear that the Ushers' spooky old house is no ordinary home. Its "excessive antiquity" with its great "discoloration of ages" combine with other features to create an unusual atmosphere ...

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Before the narrator of "The Fall of the House of Usher" has even set foot inside the place, it's clear that the Ushers' spooky old house is no ordinary home. Its "excessive antiquity" with its great "discoloration of ages" combine with other features to create an unusual atmosphere that the narrator cannot help but find oppressive.

And the singularity of this remarkable building doesn't stop with the exterior. Once inside, the narrator is subjected to yet more weird and not so wonderful sights that serve to give us an insight into the living environment of the Usher family.

As the narrator reflects, what he sees inside the house heightens the "vague sentiments" of which he's already spoken and which were induced by his apprehension of the building's exterior. All the objects he sees around him seem to transport him to a whole different dimension of existence that is at once otherworldly and deeply unnerving.

There are the carvings on the ceiling, the "sombre" tapestries hanging on the wall, the ebon blackness of the floor, and the "phantasmagoric" armorial trophies that rattle as the narrator walks past them. When all of these impressions are taken together, they contribute towards a dark, brooding atmosphere that provides a suitable backdrop to the action that follows.

What's particularly striking about these features of the house's interior is that they are all perfectly familiar to the narrator; he's been accustomed to them since he was a child. And yet they still unnerve him all the same. If the narrator didn't already know that the house of Usher occupies a very different world to the one he normally inhabits, he certainly does now.

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