In The Crucible, what are three pieces of evidence that show that Abigail Williams is lying?

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It is revealed that Abigail is lying when the adults leave Betty's room and she physically threatens Betty, Mercy Lewis, and Mary Warren to corroborate her story. Betty even mentions that Abigail drank blood to put a curse on Elizabeth Proctor, which prompts Abigail to threaten the girls. It is...

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It is revealed that Abigail is lying when the adults leave Betty's room and she physically threatens Betty, Mercy Lewis, and Mary Warren to corroborate her story. Betty even mentions that Abigail drank blood to put a curse on Elizabeth Proctor, which prompts Abigail to threaten the girls. It is also revealed the Abigail is lying when she admits to John Proctor in private that Betty's "illness" is simply pretense and that she is not bewitched. Abigail tells him that they were just dancing in the forest and were frightened when her uncle saw them. After Reverend Hale begins to question Abigail, she uses Tituba as a scapegoat by placing the blame on her. Abigail then witnesses Tituba accuse two women of witchcraft to avoid execution and begins falsely accusing numerous citizens to distract from her own transgressions. It also becomes evident that Abigail is lying when Mary Warren insists that she stuck the needle into the poppet while Abigail watched, which means that Abigail is manipulating the court officials in order to kill Elizabeth Proctor. Abigail also lies when she denies having an affair with John Proctor. In Act One, Abigail speaks to John and it is revealed that they have had relations in the past. Therefore, her denial in act three is an obvious lie. The fact that Abigail steals her uncle's life savings and flees the community indicates that she was lying the entire time.

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We know from the outset that Abigail is lying because she acknowledges her deceit when she creates it, telling the others to go along with her. 

At the play's opening, Betty Parris is pretending to be sick because she is worried about the punishment that will be inflicted on her and her friends for being discovered dancing naked in the woods. 

Abigail takes control of the situation by deflecting attention to others. She does this, however, only after the audience is clearly informed that Abigail had been drinking blood in the forest and performing rites of "witchcraft" as the town sees it. 

To protect the group from punishment for what they have done and what she has done herself, Abigail insists that the group maintain a lie. 

...she forcefully insists that the girls stick to the story that they were only dancing and that Tituba and Ruth alone conjured her dead sisters.

In the next scene, Abigail denies the truth that has just been clearly revealed when she tells Proctor that the witchcraft accusations are nonsense. She tells him that the girls were merely dancing in the woods. 

This scenario offers clear evidence from the outset that Abigail is lying. Additionally, in the first scene she lies about why she was fired from the Proctor home (her story is shown to be a lie in the second scene). She lies also about Elizabeth Proctor's poppet. This lie is recognized immediately by the audience for what it is - a deception intended to incriminate Elizabeth.

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