In The Crucible, how does Danforth explain the importance of the victims testifying in a trial for witchcraft?

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When Mr. Hale implores Deputy Governor Danforth to allow Francis Nurse, Giles Corey, and John Proctor to leave and obtain the services of a lawyer, Danforth explains his view that a lawyer is not only unnecessary but would be of no help in this particular situation. Danforth says,

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When Mr. Hale implores Deputy Governor Danforth to allow Francis Nurse, Giles Corey, and John Proctor to leave and obtain the services of a lawyer, Danforth explains his view that a lawyer is not only unnecessary but would be of no help in this particular situation. Danforth says,

In an ordinary crime, how does one defend the accused? One calls up witnesses to prove his innocence. But witchcraft is ipso facto, on its face and by its nature, an invisible crime, is it not? Therefore, who may possibly be witness to it? The witch and the victim. None other. Now we cannot hope the witch will accuse herself; granted? Therefore, we must rely upon her victims—and they do testify, the children certainly do testify.

In other words, witchcraft is not an ordinary crime. One cannot defend the accused by calling up witnesses to attest to their innocence because no one can actually physically witness the practice of witchcraft. If a witch sends out her animal familiar or her own specter, as Abigail accuses Elizabeth Proctor of doing, only her victim and the witch herself would be able to see it. Therefore, there are no possible witnesses for this kind of evidence, other than the victim and the witch, referred to as spectral evidence. In such cases, then, the court can only rely on the victims' testimony since it would be idiotic to expect a real witch to accuse herself of the crime.

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Danforth summarizes how in a normal case of crime, you have actual witnesses to the crime, eye-witness testimonies of what was done.  For example, multiple people can get up and testify that "Yes, I saw that man rob the store".  However, in the case of witchcraft, no one is witness to the crime except for "the witch and the victim."  Because a witch certainly isn't going to "accuse herself" of the crime, "we must rely upon her victims" to testify against her.  Danforth claims that the girls are all victims who are testifying against the witches.  For this reason, they should be believed, because no one else was witness to the crime.

So, the victim's testimony is the only testimony that counts, because she is the only one that was there when the crime occurred, the only one who "saw" and "felt" the witch's power.

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