Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

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In the context of the essay "Shooting an Elephant," how might the interaction between the police officer and the elephant act as an extended metaphor for the conflict between the colonizer and the...

In the context of the essay "Shooting an Elephant," how might the interaction between the police officer and the elephant act as an extended metaphor for the conflict between the colonizer and the colonized? If we view the conflict between the police officer and the elephant as a metaphor, what is the colonizer attempting to “kill” in the colonized? How do the colonized respond?

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In "Shooting an Elephant," Orwell writes that he was told the elephant had been running riot and ravaging the bazaar. By the time he arrived on the scene, however, it had become perfectly docile of its own accord, and he had no reason to shoot it except the strength of public opinion, which demanded he take charge and do something.

The elephant was not wild. It was a working elephant, which is to say, an...

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