In The Book Thief, why does Death find Liesel’s life fascinating?

In The Book Thief, Death finds Liesel's life fascinating due to her seemingly unique ability to overcome hardship and continue to live a life of joy despite the significant personal losses that she suffers during the war.

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I would argue that Death finds Liesel’s life fascinating because of the way she lives it and because of her inquiring mind. She provides a breath of fresh air in a world of darkness sullied by Nazism and war. Despite having suffered immensely since the outbreak of war, losing both...

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I would argue that Death finds Liesel’s life fascinating because of the way she lives it and because of her inquiring mind. She provides a breath of fresh air in a world of darkness sullied by Nazism and war. Despite having suffered immensely since the outbreak of war, losing both her parents, and having to bury her brother, Liesel has managed to find a source of light in her new life with her foster parents and a couple of friends. In short, she is a far cry from most of the people Death encounters.

Reading and writing provide a form of solace for Liesel, and despite the ongoing hardships and tragedies that she faces, the light of joy in Liesel appears to be irrepressible. She continues to live a happy live, thriving on family, love, and the memories that she holds dear. She does not succumb to pain, but rather overcomes it.

It is her tremendous courage and the failure of adversity to keep her down which fascinates Death. Despite enduring every imaginable type of hardship, Liesel’s spirit emerges triumphant and enables her to overcome it all. The hope that Liesel encompasses provides a beacon that shines through the doom and gloom of war, loss, and pain.

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The figure of Death in The Book Thief is much more complex than is usually portrayed. This isn't some creepy one-dimensional character we're dealing with here; he's much more recognizably human. And it's Death's human qualities that draw him into the lives of real humans, which he finds an endless source of fascination. What makes human life, in all its rich variety, so inexhaustibly fascinating to Death is the fact that he can observe it at a distance without becoming directly involved.

As for Liesel's life, it's fascinating to Death because it provides him with a brief respite from all the misery and suffering with which he has to deal on a regular basis and which really gets him down from time to time. For in Liesel's life, despite its many hardships and troubles, Death also sees great hope. Such hope shines like a beacon, cutting through the moral darkness and misery of life in Nazi-occupied Europe. Although Death may be destined to be haunted by humans, he's not destined to be haunted by despair. And for that, he has Liesel to thank.

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In The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, Death describes himself as extremely overworked and weary of the things he has seen humanity do to themselves. Death is fascinated with Liesel, the protagonist of The Book Thief, because she continues to live and to celebrate life and freedom in others, even loving other people despite her circumstances. To say that Liesel is living in dire circumstances would be an understatement. When Liesel is introduced in the novel, she has been put on a train in Germany to travel to a small town close to Munich in the winter of 1939. Her father has disappeared. Her brother dies of illness and exposure on the train, and her mother disappears, leaving Liesel to bury her brother. She does not want to trust anyone but gradually learns to trust her foster parents, Hans and Rosa; Max, a friend of the family; and Rudy, a neighbor boy. Despite her enormous grief and loss, Liesel learns to read and write and begins writing her own novel. Everyone that she loves (except Max, who is conscripted into the army) is killed in an explosion. Yet, Death tells the reader that Liesel leads a happy life full of love, memories, and family. Through her enormous pain and loss, Liesel represents a triumph of the human spirit, an ability to recover from trauma and a will to live that fascinates Death.

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