In the book The Outsiders, how does Johnny change?

In The Outsiders, Johnny changes from a quiet, fearful boy into a courageous, outspoken teenager who is willing to speak his mind and sacrifice himself for others. Throughout the novel, Johnny develops a significant amount of confidence and self-esteem. He challenges Dally, takes responsibility for his actions, and stands up to his mother. Johnny also demonstrates his intelligence and enhanced perspective of the world by helping others and sharing his knowledge.

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At the beginning of the story, Johnny is portrayed as a reticent, shy boy who has a terrible homelife and is extremely afraid of Socs. After being jumped by a group of Socs and suffering serious injuries, Johnny carries a switchblade with him and vows to never let it happen...

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At the beginning of the story, Johnny is portrayed as a reticent, shy boy who has a terrible homelife and is extremely afraid of Socs. After being jumped by a group of Socs and suffering serious injuries, Johnny carries a switchblade with him and vows to never let it happen again. As the story progresses, Johnny begins to open up and becomes more outspoken and confident. At the drive-in movies, Johnny defends the Soc cheerleaders by challenging Dally, which astonishes Ponyboy. Later that evening, Johnny courageously defends Ponyboy by stabbing Bob Sheldon in self-defense to prevent Ponyboy from drowning. Following the death of Bob Sheldon, Johnny and Pony consult Dally and hide out in an abandoned church in Windrixville.

Johnny's character continues to develop while he is hiding out with Ponyboy. Johnny demonstrates his intelligence by comprehending the novel Gone with the Wind, develops a closer relationship with his friend, and shows that he is willing to take responsibility for his actions by deciding to turn himself in against Dally's wishes. Johnny's decision to enter the burning church also illustrates his newfound confidence and determination. Johnny proves that he is no longer the timid, fearful boy he once was by entering the burning church and helping Ponyboy save the children.

Once Johnny is in the hospital, his character continues to develop as he struggles with the bleak reality of his situation. Before Johnny passes away, he stands up for himself by refusing to see his mother. He tells Dally the truth about his violent life and encourages Ponyboy to remain innocent. Johnny's final letter to Ponyboy also illustrates his character development. Johnny writes that he has accepted the fact that he will die but does not regret saving the children from the church. Johnny also depicts his enhanced perspective and spiritual growth by metaphorically interpreting the Robert Frost poem and encouraging Ponyboy to remain innocent. By the end of the story, Johnny has developed into a courageous, outspoken teenager with an enhanced perspective of the world and a desire to help others.

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Johnny is initially described as being the "gang's pet" and is an extremely timid, quiet boy. Johnny also has a terrible home life and desperately wishes that his parents would show him affection. After Johnny stabs and kills Bob Sheldon in self-defense, he runs away with Ponyboy and the two boys become close friends during their time spent hiding out in an abandoned church on Jay Mountain. While the boys are hiding out, Johnny opens up and becomes more confident and assertive. He demonstrates his intelligence and also becomes more outspoken, to the point that he even announces to Dally that he will turn himself in. Johnny also shows his dramatic change in personality by courageously entering the burning church and saving several of the children trapped inside.

After Johnny suffers a serious injury during the church fire, he once again illustrates his newfound confidence by refusing to see his callous mother and encouraging Ponyboy to stay gold. Johnny's growth, self-awareness, and confidence are also depicted in the letter he wrote to Ponyboy before he passed away. In the letter, Johnny says that he has come to terms with his death and is happy that he saved the children from the fire. Johnny also tells Ponyboy to retain his innocence and encourages Dally to look at a sunset. Overall, Johnny's change is personality and attitude is illustrated by his newfound confidence and ability to express his intimate feelings, which is drastically different from his former introvert, timid demeanor.

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Johnny has the worst home life of any of the greasers. His father beats him all the time, and his mother pays little attention to him. So, the gang is his true family. He is the "gang's pet, everyone's kid brother." The smallest member and second youngest next to Ponyboy, Johnny was beaten badly when he was jumped by a gang of Socs. Since that time, he carries a knife, and he is always scared of being alone. However, he shows courage when he stands up to Dally at the drive-in in defense of Cherry, and the attention he receives from the girls is appreciated.

Later, he summons his courage again, using the knife when he sees Pony being drowned in the fountain, but it sickens him to know that he has killed "that boy." Even before the fire at the church, he realizes that they must go back and face the consequences, but he seems to understand that jail will be no worse than being with his parents. Johnny primarily wants to return for Pony's sake, since he knows Pony's brothers will be worried about his whereabouts and safety. When he realizes that it is their cigarettes which have caused the fire, Johnny is the first one into the church. As he explains later, the children's lives are more important than his own, and they owe it to the kids inside to get them out. As Johnny contemplates his future in the hospital, he is proud of his act of heroism. Knowing he is about to die, he writes Pony a last letter, telling him to never give up, and pressing him to try and convince Dally that he can still change his ways as well. Johnny really doesn't change that much over the course of the novel--he remains the down-to-earth kid that he always was--but circumstances create opportunities for him to step forward in truly heroic fashion, and he dies a tragic figure.

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