In the book, The Great Gatsby, on what page in Chapter 2 does Nick talk about the valley of ashes?

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Page numbers vary by edition, so it is easier to direct you to the paragraph you are looking for in chapter two of The Great Gatsby: the chapter's opening paragraph.

Nick describes the area in between Long Island and Manhattan (actually, it is Queens), as a wasteland polluted with...

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Page numbers vary by edition, so it is easier to direct you to the paragraph you are looking for in chapter two of The Great Gatsby: the chapter's opening paragraph.

Nick describes the area in between Long Island and Manhattan (actually, it is Queens), as a wasteland polluted with the heavy ash that is brought on freight cars on the railroad leaving Manhattan. The ash is created by the burning of wood and coal in the city, and it is freighted to the outskirts for dumping.

This is the area where George and Myrtle Wilson operate a gasoline station and auto repair business, and where they live in their apartment above the business. There is also a coffee shop here, but not much else.

Nick describes the valley of ashes as a place of despair whose working men "move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air." It is a place where dreams die and ugly truths unfold.

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In the Scribner, New York, 2004, edition of the novel, the passage to which you seem to refer begins on page 23.  It is in the very first paragraph of Chapter II.  Nick says,

This is a valley of ashes -- a fantastic farm where ashes grow like what into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens; where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and, finally, with a transcendent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air.

The valley of ashes is an area between West Egg and New York City, and it really represents the terrible price of industrialization and the futility of an attempt to reach the American Dream, revealed in the novel as a fictionGeorge Wilson, husband of the unfaithful and cruel Myrtle, lives here.  He tries to work hard, but it seems that he can just never get ahead, and he is taken advantage of by his hateful wife (who longs for status and money that he cannot provide) as well as Tom Buchanan (who enjoys lording his status over Wilson, figuratively dangling his car in front of the mechanic like a carrot).  Wilson's plight shows how the idea that one can achieve success and prosperity with simple hard work and determination is a fantasy.

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