In the book The Giver, why is Jonas uneasy about his new assignment, Receiver Of Memory?

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The Giverby Lois Lowry is a classic example of government gone awry.  It showcases the error in trying to prevent humanity from harming itself, by instituting unequivocal sameness, and ultimately doing more harm than good.

As Receiver of Memory, Jonas inherits the position, and duties, that keep his...

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The Giver by Lois Lowry is a classic example of government gone awry.  It showcases the error in trying to prevent humanity from harming itself, by instituting unequivocal sameness, and ultimately doing more harm than good.

As Receiver of Memory, Jonas inherits the position, and duties, that keep his community in a state of bland, antiseptic sameness.  While, in theory, this protects the people, it also turns them into living robots.

Once Jonas has received the memories of his culture, both "good" and "bad", he realizes the enormous responsibility and control that has been placed upon his young shoulders.

For the first time, he is allowed to experience colors and music and feelings of true happiness. He also experiences hunger and the effects of war and feelings of true unhappiness.

His apprehensions arise from the knowledge that while the elders who devised the position of Receiver of Memory did so out of a desire to protect civilization, that they have greatly compromised the quality of life.  There may be no more poverty, hunger, and war; but, there is also no ambition, fulfillment, or beauty.

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