The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

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In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, how does Jim's good nature influence Huckleberry's sense of morality?

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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It's no exaggeration to say that Jim helps Huck grow up, morally and emotionally. Before they set off on their adventures along the Mississippi together, Huck was rather immature, to say the least. Although his moral values were generally fine for a boy of his age, he still had the occasional lapse, such as joining with Tom in playing mean tricks on Jim.

But all that changes when Huck gets to spend more time in Jim's company. It's only then that he starts to see Jim as a human being, someone who's just the same as himself beneath the skin. Jim helps Huck to escape the confines of his time and culture, which are rooted in notions of white supremacy. Out there on the raft, things couldn't be more different. There, Huck and Jim are just two human beings, not a white boy and a runaway slave—as they would be back on dry land.

Jim's innate goodness comes through at various points. A notable example would be his protecting of Huck by preventing from seeing his old man's dead body in the old...

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