In Tears of a Tiger, what happened when Andy visited the school counselor?

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During his second visit to his psychologist, Andy recounts having visited the school counselor once for graduation requirements, and it was not a productive encounter for him. There was a significant disconnect between them as she was distant with the way she ended up giving a lecture on career goals...

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During his second visit to his psychologist, Andy recounts having visited the school counselor once for graduation requirements, and it was not a productive encounter for him. There was a significant disconnect between them as she was distant with the way she ended up giving a lecture on career goals without paying much heed to his personal goals. He mentions to his psychologist of how the counselor only responded with a look of shock when he mentioned to her that he intended to take up pre-law. Instead of encouragement, she went on convincing him instead to take advantage of his "athletic potential," as taking up pre-law was something that might be far too complicated for him:

"Why don’t you major in P.E., enjoy your college years, then maybe come back here in a few years and teach gym?"

We see here the condescending way she treats Andy with the way she dismisses his ambitions based on a belittling view of him. Andy himself is well-aware of this and how this is something that not only he experiences. He also notes how the same condescending behavior is something he experiences from the teachers as well:

"I guess she just assumes I’m another stupid black kid. So it’s easier to pretend to be stupid than to be bothered with all that grade-grubbin’ that the white kids do. Lotsa white kids, and some of the white teachers too, think all of us are sorta dumb. They don’t say it, but they do. The teachers ask us easier questions, if they ask us anythin’ at all, and they expect dumb answers. So I just give ‘em what they want."

Andy's psychologist is well aware of this reality, having experienced the same himself. He acknowledges Andy's recollection and responds in a way that is in sharp contrast to the disconnect Andy and the counselor had:

"It’s like the system is set up so you don’t succeed. I know. I’ve been there."

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