In tact II, scene I of Spike Heels, when Georgie and Lydia are speaking/yelling at each other, what is Georgie's objective? What is her purpose in the scene?

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The play Spike Heels presents an engaging examination of love and contemporary relationships. Andrew and Lydia are in a relationship, although Lydia is concerned that Andrew wants to postpone their impending marriage. Andrew’s neighbor Georgie confides in him that her boss, Edward, has made unwanted sexual advances toward her, and Andrew confesses to giving permission to Edward to pursue her.

Georgie changes clothes in front of Andrew, which makes him feel uncomfortable. She also tries to seduces Andrew, which sets up the sexual tension between them.

In act II, scene I, Georgie and Lydia argue. Lydia feels jealous of Georgie because of her proximity to Andrew as his neighbor and confidant. She is also suspicious that Georgie and Andrew have had sex, which may be the driver behind Andrew’s cold feet.

During the argument, which ranges from a heated conversation to outright contentious, Georgie reveals her feelings of inferiority, as it’s clear that Lydia thinks she is better than Georgie. Both Georgie and Lydia want the other to see the situation from their perspective, and that goal is largely successfully achieved. Both Georgie and Lydia leave the argument with a better understanding of the other, and they are also able to find common ground, namely in their overall distrust of men, which changes both characters for the remainder of the play.

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At first, Georgie just wants Lydia to calm down and go away. She doesn't want to deal with her. She tries to tell her that she's wrong and to interrupt her so that Lydia will stop ranting. When she confesses to Lydia that she can't cope with the interaction and is worried about getting angry again, it helps defuse Lydia. They decide to have a drink together.

When Lydia gets upset and pushes Georgie farther, Georgie finally gets mad and snaps at her. She wants to make Lydia stop, to make her see things from Georgie's perspective, and to recognize that there's no reason for her to be there. She shames Lydia for thinking that she's better than the people that Georgie grew up with; perhaps she thinks she can goad Lydia into leaving.

Lydia finally decides to leave and then Georgie realizes what Lydia said about Andrew postponing the wedding. Georgie asks her to say.

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During the second scene in the play, Georgie and Edward are in the midst of hooking up, when Lydia arrives to break them up. She believes initially that she caught Georgie hooking up with her fiance, Andrew. An argument breaks out between the two women, who accuse one another of trying to ruin the other's relationship.

Georgie tries in this instance to get Lydia to address her failing relationship with Andrew, who has put off the wedding and is clearly showing cold feet. Georgie is in love with him, but Lydia is as well. When Andrew arrives, many discussions splinter off from the main one, with Andrew revealing that he and Lydia had slept together when she was dating Edward, and many other revelations. In the end, everyone is left doubting their relationships, and the women have less faith in men than they began with.

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Georgie bursts out in a fit of anger in this scene because of her feelings for Andrew. Lydia is afraid of the budding relationship between Andrew and Georgie and thinks they may have already consummated their relationship. In the end, Georgie's feelings of inferiority and her desire for Andrew lead her to anger as she lashes out back at Lydia.

It turns out that the two women find they have much in common through their argument, and both are trapped by their feelings towards Andrew. Through the fight, Georgie comes to see Lydia in a new light, and is also enlightened about the men in their lives. She grows jaded quickly through this experience, and resolves to change things. The climax at this point is about Georgie confronting her emotions and the negative feelings she receives from both Lydia and Andrew, and the resolution shows how she has grown through the conflict.

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This is a pivotal scene for all four of the characters. Lydia's arrival is the climax of the play because it reveals the main conflicts of each of the characters. Edward is struggling to do the right thing for Andrew and Georgie, Lydia is afraid Georgie and Andrew have already slept together, reflecting Andrew's feelings for Georgie, Andrew doesn't know what to do after his fight with Lydia, unsure of his feelings for either woman, and Georgie struggles between her love for Andrew and his treatment of her as inferior to him.

Georgie and Lydia discover the commonalities they have as women, clearing up misconceptions each one had of the other. Lydia admits that Georgie isn't the only reason for her problems with Andrew, and Georgie discovers that perhaps Andrew 's interest in her has been to mold her into a better version of Lydia, rather than having any real feelings for her.

The purpose of the scene is to present the climax, the most intense moment in the play. It is a turning point for each of the four characters because they all learn something about the others that changes their opinion about the other characters. For Georgie, it's an eye-opening experience as she walks out of the apartment, cynically thanking Edward and Andrew. Georgie now knows the truth about the other three characters, and this reflects how the play will end.

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