In "Strange Meeting," Owen writes about "the pity of war, the pity war distilled." How do the selections of poems by Sassoon and Owen contend with "the pity of war?" Analyze passages from several poems to support your points.

Owen and Sassoon both write confrontationally about the effect of war on soldiers, whether that be its physical effect, as in Owen's "Disabled" or Sassoon's "The Death Bed," or its mental effect, as in Sassoon's "Repression of War Experience." They evoke the pity of war by presenting its realities and dispelling the idea that war is a just effort which brings glory.

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You haven't specified which poems exactly you are asking about, but there are certainly many poems by both Owen and Sassoon which you could explore as examples of writing on "the pity of war."

In "Strange Meeting ," Owen describes the pity of war as war's "untold truth." He...

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You haven't specified which poems exactly you are asking about, but there are certainly many poems by both Owen and Sassoon which you could explore as examples of writing on "the pity of war."

In "Strange Meeting," Owen describes the pity of war as war's "untold truth." He uses the figure of a dead German soldier to express this truth: the fact that he chooses a German soldier underscores the true sadness of sending young men to fight against others who would have been their "friends" in another life. Nothing divides these young men but nationality; nothing unites them but their suffering. The specter appeals to the intruding soldier, suggesting that they "sleep now."

Owen depicts another extremely piteous scene in his poem "Disabled," in which we see the aftermath of war in a way that was rarely seen in poetry before this time. The "legless" and armless young man who once joined the army because he was told he would look "a god in kilts" is a living example of the pity of war. Having been bewitched by "the old lie" (in "Dulce et Decorum Est") that it is sweet and good to die for your country, he has returned from war, not dead but not a hero, either. Instead, he is a broken man who girls touch "like some queer disease."

Sassoon's poetry expresses the pity of war, too. In "Repression of War Experience," he vividly depicts the sad image of a soldier suffering from shellshock, reassuring himself that he is still as whole as he ever was—"what a steady hand!"—when this is evidently an untruth. At the end of the poem, the speaker accepts that he is "going stark, staring mad because of the guns." In another poem, "The Death Bed," Sassoon presents another melancholy image of a soldier who has not achieved the longed-for glory but is instead gripped with "pain" and bound to die for a cause that was not his own. As Sassoon asks,

He's young; he hated war; how should he die
When cruel old campaigners win safe through?
For both Owen and Sassoon, a lot of the "pity of war" lay in the fact that the causes were unjust, and the sufferers were young men who had no investment in those causes, while the men who orchestrated the war were removed from the pain.
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