In Shakespeare's The Tempest, how does Caliban act toward Prospero?

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One of the most critically studied components of Shakespeare's The Tempestis the relationship between Caliban and Prospero. In general, Caliban's manner toward Prospero is hostile, and his actions toward the former Duke of Milan reflect this negative opinion.

Caliban has good reason to hate Prospero and criticize him....

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One of the most critically studied components of Shakespeare's The Tempest is the relationship between Caliban and Prospero. In general, Caliban's manner toward Prospero is hostile, and his actions toward the former Duke of Milan reflect this negative opinion.

Caliban has good reason to hate Prospero and criticize him. Prospero is the former Duke of Milan and lives in exile on the island after his throne was usurped by Antonio, his brother. The island was originally ruled by Sycorax, an "evil" witch overthrown by Prospero. Upon his ascendence to power, Prospero forced Sycorax's deformed and monstrous son, Caliban, into servitude. When the play opens, we see Caliban bitterly acting as Prospero's serving boy.

As one might expect, Caliban hates Prospero and makes no secret of his feelings. He curses Prospero in Act 1, Scene 2, saying, "all the charms/ Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you!" (339-40), and "you taught me language, and my profit on't/ Is, I know how to curse (363-4). Thus, in a nutshell, Caliban acts in a hostile manner toward Prospero and would love nothing more than to be rid of him.

Many scholars view this hostile relationship in postcolonial terms. Prospero, for instance, can be seen as the colonizer, who conquers the natives, teaches them according to Western traditions, but also forces them into slavery. Caliban, likewise, is the archetypal native who has lost his cultural sovereignty. In this context, Caliban's hostility can be seen as akin to the various rebellions against colonial powers in India, Ireland, and elsewhere. Thinking about Caliban and Prospero's relationship in these terms makes it easier to understand Caliban's reasons for showing hostility toward Prospero.  

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