In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, what news does Balthasar bring to Romeo in act 5, scene 1, and how does Romeo react?

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Balthasar reveals to Romeo that Juliet is dead in Act V, Scene 1. He tells Romeo,

Her body sleeps in Capels’ monument,And her immortal part with angels lives.I saw her laid low in her kindred’s vaultAnd presently took post to tell it you.
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Balthasar reveals to Romeo that Juliet is dead in Act V, Scene 1. He tells Romeo,

Her body sleeps in Capels’ monument,
And her immortal part with angels lives.
I saw her laid low in her kindred’s vault
And presently took post to tell it you.
In a case of dramatic irony, Balthasar knows nothing of the Friar's plan for Juliet to fake her death and in the next scene the audience finds out that Romeo doesn't get the message from the Friar announcing the plan. Thus, Romeo reacts as he does throughout the play. He leaps to action without considering the implications of those actions. He is predictably impetuous. Upon hearing the news he launches into a plan to commit suicide in the Capulet tomb next to Juliet. He says, "Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight." He orders Balthasar to "hire post-horses" so they can immediately go to the tomb and he finds a poor apothecary (pharmacist) to buy poison from. He actually bribes the apothecary because it was against the law in Mantua to sell the substance. He is so bent on his plan that he even kills Count Paris outside the tomb when he arrives. Had he been just little more introspective, he may have not been so hasty. The Friar actually arrives in the tomb not long after Romeo has taken the poison.  
 
 
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In the final act of the play, we see Balthasar deliver the news to Romeo that Juliet has died. The lines Balthasar delivers to portray the news have an ounce of irony in them. When Romeo asks how Juliet is and says that "nothing can be ill if she be well," Balthasar ironically replies, "Then she is well, and nothing can be ill" and goes on to explain that she has died (V.i.16-17). The irony in this statement is that because she is dead, Romeo will not think that she is well; however, because she is dead she can also never be ill again because she can never suffer again through sorrow or sickness. Therefore, Balthasar speaks ironic truth when he describes Juliet's death as being "well."

Romeo's reaction to the news is to curse the stars. It is also ironic that Romeo had just had a dream about Juliet waking him from the dead with a kiss that he took to be a good omen. Now it seems to Romeo that fate has tricked him. Fate has also surprised him by taking Juliet's life, when earlier in the play he believed that he would die young as a result of crashing the Capulet's ball. Hence, he shouts out, "Is it e'en so? Then I defy you, stars!" (24), meaning that he is going to try and challenge fate. If fate wants to take Juliet's life and leave him alive, then he is going to challenge fate's decision by taking his own life in his hand. Hence, Romeo's response to Balthasar's news is to decide to commit suicide in Juliet's tomb, by her side.

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