In Rupert Brooke's poem "The Soldier", is the phrase, "all shed away," a reference to evil  of the individual soldier or to the war itself?

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In a sense, the dichotomy between individual and universal evil may be a false opposition, for the nameless soldier narrator of this poem is not really an individual, so much as a universal soldier. When he speaks of "all evil" being "shed away" after death, he is saying that after...

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In a sense, the dichotomy between individual and universal evil may be a false opposition, for the nameless soldier narrator of this poem is not really an individual, so much as a universal soldier.

When he speaks of "all evil" being "shed away" after death, he is saying that after we die we can no longer commit evil (e.g. kill people) nor be victims of evil (Brooke emphasizes in his poetry the horrific sufferings undergone by soldiers in the trenches). There is a religious overtone in this as well, in which there is no possibility of sin after death, but instead we become uncorruptable souls in heavenly bodies.

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