In Of Mice and Men, out of anger, what does Lennie do to the puppy?

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At the beginning of chapter 5, Lennie sits inside the barn, lamenting about accidentally killing the pup that Slim gave him. Lennie is notorious for accidentally killing small animals by stroking them too hard and aggressively. Lennie speaks to himself in the barn and contemplates whether or not his offense...

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At the beginning of chapter 5, Lennie sits inside the barn, lamenting about accidentally killing the pup that Slim gave him. Lennie is notorious for accidentally killing small animals by stroking them too hard and aggressively. Lennie speaks to himself in the barn and contemplates whether or not his offense warrants a journey to the secret spot by the river. Lennie then picks up the dead puppy and wonders if George will still allow him to tend rabbits on their farm. Lennie's primary concern is how George will react once he discovers that he accidentally killed the puppy. After Lennie thinks about George punishing him, he picks up the dead puppy and hurls it across the barn in a fit of anger. When Lennie hears the men outside, he picks up the pup, lays it on a bed of hay next to him, and slowly begins stroking it again.

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Lennie loves small animals. He never gets angry with them while they are alive. His problem is that he kills them by holding them too hard or handling them too roughly. Because of the combination of his mental handicap and his great strength, he doesn't realize what he is doing to the poor animals until it is too late. He doesn't seem able to learn to be gentle enough, though his heart is in the right place.

Lennie is delighted to have the puppy, but he somehow bumps it too hard and it dies. This makes him sad at first, and he strokes the puppy in regret. However, he realizes that George will know he killed it and fears that, as a result, George won't let him have rabbits on the farm they dream of buying. Therefore, he gets angry. He directs the anger at the puppy, saying:

“God damn you ... Why do you got to get killed? You ain’t so little as mice.” He picked up the pup and hurled it from him. He turned his back on it.

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Lennie, from John Stienbeck's Of Mice and Men, never actually does anything to the puppies out of anger.  In reality, Lennie is simply wanting to play with the puppies.  He, unfortunately, does not his own strength, or how to handle puppies, and kills the one given to him.  After killing the puppy, Lennie does, in fact, get angry at the puppy for dying.  The death of the puppy, for Lennie symbolizes the death of his dream to tend to the rabbits at the ranch he and George wish to have.  George had told Lennie that if he got into any more trouble that he would not be able to tend to the rabbits on the ranch and Lennie sees the death of the puppy as the end to his own dream.

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