In Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, how does Oedipus's ignorance lead to his blindness to truth?

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In the ancient Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex, written by Sophocles in about 440 BC, Oedipus's ignorance of the circumstances of his life don't lead directly to his blindness to the truth. His blindness to the truth is his purposeful refusal to believe the truth, even after it's been revealed to him.

In his Poetics, Aristotle wrote that the best Greek tragedies—of which he considered Oedipus Rex the best example—proceed in a logical cause-and-effect manner. In Oedipus Rex , the revelation of one truth leads to the revelation of another truth until all truths are revealed and the play comes to its logical...

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        Ignorance means want of knowledge but also mistake, misunderstanding (OED). So, Oedipus's fatal mistake is assuredly his conspicuous lack of understanding of human relationships since he is afforded with the possibility to escape his fate several times - to no avail.

       He is impervious to the other characters' desire 'not to know' or to have him stay ignorant of the truth for his own sake. He may be devoted to Thebes until the end, and yet, he is utterly inefficient and bitter.

      The tragic ending brings about the catharsis and the purgation of passions but there's room for doubt: didn't he all bring it  himself    merely by forcing the other charactes to talk. Indeed, the etymology of the word "fate" is "that which cannot be spoken".  

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