In Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, how does Oedipus's ignorance lead to his blindness to truth?

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In the ancient Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex, written by Sophocles in about 440 BC, Oedipus's ignorance of the circumstances of his life don't lead directly to his blindness to the truth. His blindness to the truth is his purposeful refusal to believe the truth, even after it's been revealed to him.

In his Poetics, Aristotle wrote that the best Greek tragedies—of which he considered Oedipus Rex the best example—proceed in a logical cause-and-effect manner. In Oedipus Rex, the revelation of one truth leads to the revelation of another truth until all truths are revealed and the play comes to its logical and, for Oedipus, inevitably tragic end.

Oedipus Rex begins, as most classic Greek tragedies do, in the midst of a crisis. The people of Thebes are suffering from a drought and a plague, and they appeal to Oedipus, King of Thebes, to relieve them of their suffering.

The Oracle at Delphi reveals that in order for the famine and pestilence to end, Thebans must find and banish the person who murdered...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 1032 words.)

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