In "Ode on a Grecian Urn," why are "unheard melodies" sweeter to the speaker than "heard melodies"? Is there a paradox here?

In "Ode on a Grecian Urn," Keats says that "unheard melodies" are sweeter than those that are heard because the imagination is superior to the senses. However, the poem that makes this point is necessarily constructed out of heard melodies.

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In the second stanza of "Ode on a Grecian Urn," Keats writes,

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on;
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd,
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone
The poet has just described...

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In the second stanza of "Ode on a Grecian Urn," Keats writes,

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on;
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd,
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone
The poet has just described the archaic pastoral scene, complete with musicians playing "pipes and timbrels," depicted on the vase that is his subject. The melodies played by these instruments are sweeter than any real music because they are played in the imagination of the person looking at the vase. Keats, even more than the other Romantic poets, believes in the mystical power of the imagination to create something too pure and beautiful to be experienced by the senses. No music played by real instruments can be as perfect as the music that he hears in his mind when he looks at the vase.
The paradox here is that Keats is perhaps the most purely musical poet in the English language and is using the most sensually beautiful words to create the poem. Professor Terry Eagleton, when remarking how hard it is to define literature, uses the first line of this poem to illustrate the mellifluous quality of poetry and point out how different it is from common speech. Keats cannot use pure spirit or unheard melodies to construct his poems. He has to use words. The poem that dismisses the impact of mere music upon "the sensual ear" uses this type of verbal music to make that point.
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