In Night, young men with knives talk about a revolt. Why don’t rebel? What do you think of this decision? Explain your response.

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Immediately after arriving at Auschwitz, Elie, his father, and the other Jewish prisoners are divided by gender into two different lines. Elie does not even have enough time to say goodbye to his mother and sister as he and his father prepare to experience their first selection process. Fortunately, a...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

Immediately after arriving at Auschwitz, Elie, his father, and the other Jewish prisoners are divided by gender into two different lines. Elie does not even have enough time to say goodbye to his mother and sister as he and his father prepare to experience their first selection process. Fortunately, a helpful prisoner instructs Elie to tell the Nazi officers that he is eighteen and Elie's father is forty to increase their chances of surviving the selection. Shortly after receiving the valuable advice, another inmate strikes fear throughout the crowd by pointing to the flames and saying that they will all be turned to ash by the ruthless Nazi soldiers.

The crowd of Jewish prisoners reacts to this horrific scenario by beginning to speak of revolt. Elie recalls a few tough young men with knives encouraging them to attack the armed guards and preparing to rise up against the Nazis. However, their fathers intervene and advise them to give up their plans and remain hopeful that God will protect them. In addition to their father's advice, the young men are not prepared to risk their lives. They recognize that there is not a good chance of surviving the uprising if they decide to attack the heavily armed Nazi guards. While the idea of revolting is entertaining, the young men recognize that they have their entire lives ahead of them and would rather take the chance of surviving the concentration camp than risk their lives in a suicidal revolt. It would be difficult to even imagine being in that situation, but the idea of revolting would mean instant death. One would be hard-pressed to make such a drastic decision at that pivotal moment and be willing sacrifice their lives to lead a revolt.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team