In Night, Moishe the Beadle is deported because he was a foreign Jew. What affect did this have on Elie and the non-foreign Jews of Sighet?

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At the beginning of the novel, Moishe the Beadle is deported across the Hungarian border because he is a foreign Jew. He is also the only Jew living in Sighet that ends up witnessing the Gestapo committing atrocities in the Galician forest. Moishe tells the citizens of Sighet that the...

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At the beginning of the novel, Moishe the Beadle is deported across the Hungarian border because he is a foreign Jew. He is also the only Jew living in Sighet that ends up witnessing the Gestapo committing atrocities in the Galician forest. Moishe tells the citizens of Sighet that the Gestapo officers shot men, women, and children without hesitation. He also recalls how the Nazi officers threw infants into the air and used them as target practice. Fortunately, Moishe the Beadle only got shot in the leg and was left for dead, which is how he managed to escape. When Moishe the Beadle returns to Sighet, he tells his horrific account to anybody he sees. However, the Jews living in Sighet do not believe him and begin to ridicule Moishe the Beadle for telling fanciful tales. Elie writes,

He spoke only of what he had seen. But people not only refused to believe his tales, they refused to listen. Some even insinuated that he only wanted their pity, that he was imagining things. Others flatly said that he had gone mad.

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Your question refers to Elie Wiesel's Night, in which Moishe the Beadle is a minor character that Eliezer describes when reflecting on his childhood. Moishe the Beadle had been Eliezer's teacher as Eliezer was studying the Kaballah and its mysteries. Eliezer had grown to believe that Moishe would help him "enter eternity" through their discussions of the material. But on page 6 of the narrative, suddenly Eliezer tells us, "AND THEN, one day all foreign Jews were expelled from Sighet. And Moishe the Beadle was a foreigner."

The arrest and deportation of foreign Jews meant that Eliezer was separated from Moishe the Beadle. Sighet's remaining Jews may have cried while their foreign Jewish friends were being taken away by the Hungarian police, but they soon forgot about those who were taken, according to Eliezer. Nobody knew what fate might be in store for the deported Jews, but they were rumored to have been taken to nearby Galicia and put to work. Eliezer did not learn the horrible truth until Moishe showed up again one day in the Sighet synagogue and relayed the story of how he escaped being murdered by the Gestapo in a Galician forest. Moishe's escape and return to Sighet was an opportunity for the non-foreign Jews of Sighet to realize what was probably in store for all of them in the near future, but tragically, they did not heed his warnings.

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