In Night By Elie Wiesel, humanity was lost in the camps. Note acts of kindness and signs of hope in the midst of the bestiality.

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Despite the horrific, inhumane conditions of the Nazi concentration camps, Elie witnesses small acts of human kindness that help him survive and endure the pain. When Elie and his father first arrive at Buna, a veteran prisoner tells Elie to say that he is eighteen and his father is forty...

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Despite the horrific, inhumane conditions of the Nazi concentration camps, Elie witnesses small acts of human kindness that help him survive and endure the pain. When Elie and his father first arrive at Buna, a veteran prisoner tells Elie to say that he is eighteen and his father is forty years old. Simply by changing their ages, Elie and his father increase their chances of survival and avoid being separated.

Another prisoner named Béla Katz slips Elie and his father a note telling them not to appear too strong in order to avoid being sent to work in the crematorium.

While Elie is working in an electrical warehouse, Idek vents his fury by severely beating Elie for no apparent reason. When Idek leaves the warehouse, a beautiful French woman working alongside Elie comforts him and offers him words of encouragement.

After the Jewish prisoners endure a death march through the snow in the middle of the night, they finally arrive at the Gleiwitz camp and are packed into crowded barracks. Pressed together in the tightly packed barracks, Juliek begins playing a portion of Beethoven's concerto, which brings Elie and his father respite and hope in the horrific environment.

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You might want to focus on the relationship between Elie and his father in your response. The fact that they were at the camp together gave each one of them a reason to hold on and try to endure. A recurrent situation occurs in the book where each man gives up his tiny ration of food when he feels the other one needs it more. Toward the end of their stay in the concentration camp, Elie and father begin to reverse roles. Elie describes his father's growing weakness and vulnerability and begins to compare him to a lost child. He does things like giving away his ration in bread so that he can have a cot near his father.

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This one won't be easy.  Simply put, Wiesel's narrative displays how human kindness was a rarity in the camps.  The dentist's generosity at Buna in letting Elie go would be one such example.  Since he is executed for both this and the perception that he stole, it can be presumed that the dentist was not the norm.  At Auschwitz, when Elie is told to lie about his age, that might be seen as an act of kindness in that it is intended to help him stay alive.  Eliezer comes to think of this in another light when recognizing that a true dislosure of his age might have allowed him to stay with his mother, albeit die with her.  The French girl at Buna is an example of someone who represents the idea of a haven in a heartless world.  As she helps Eliezer out, there is a distinct feeling of some level of humanity presented in a setting where only the worst are on display.  The fact that later on, Wiesel was able to recognize her, and understand that the girl took great risk in speaking to him and helping him confirms that there was a moment, an instant, of humanity in a setting that was fairly devoid of it.

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