In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, what is the monster’s reaction when he sees himself reflected in a pool of water?

In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, when the creature sees himself reflected in a pool of water his reaction is one of disgust. For the first time, the creature sees himself as others see him, and he realizes how hideous he appears to them.

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The creature longs to connect with humanity, and this feeling is amplified when he discovers the cottagers. He admires them not only for the warm relationships they share with each other but also for their "grace, beauty, and delicate complexions."

In this section of the novel, the creature speaks for himself; it is significant that he is given his own voice to explain the pain he has felt about the constant rejection he has faced by not only Victor but by all of humanity.

In his efforts to spy upon the cottagers and learn more about them, the creature passes by a transparent pool of water. When he sees his reflection for the first time, at first he cannot even believe that the image is his own. Ultimately, he is forced to confront the truth—that the hideous reflection is indeed of his own appearance. The creature thus becomes convinced that this reflection accurately presents "the monster that I am."

The word choice of "monster" is significant here. While Victor uses the term "creature"...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 1056 words.)

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