In Julius Caesar, What are 3 examples of repetition in Brutus's speech after he kills Caesar?

In Julius Caesar, three examples of repetition in Brutus's speech after he kills Caesar are "Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more," "There is tears for his love, joy for his fortune, honor for his valor, and death for his ambition," and three repetitions of "If any, speak—for him have I offended."

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Brutus uses repetition frequently in his speech after Caesar's death. This is a critically important speech for Brutus and all the conspirators, because Brutus, the most honorable of them, will have to have to convince the people of Rome of the assassins' good intentions in order to avoid riot and upheaval.

Brutus uses repetition to create parallelism when he states "that I loved" twice: this helps establish that his actions came not out of heartlessness but from love of Rome:

Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.

Brutus employs similar parallel structure in the repeated "for his" construction to show that while he thought very highly of Caesar, he could only take that respect so far:

There is tears for his love, joy for his fortune, honor for his valor, and death for his ambition....

Near the end of the speech, Brutus repeats three times,

If any, speak—for him have I offended.

This is a rhetorical flourish—Brutus is not expecting any of the audience to speak out against what he...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 949 words.)

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