In Julius Caesar, how do the conspirators plan to proceed with the murder? Explain in detail.

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The conspirators are Cassius, Casca, Cinna, Decius, Metellus Cimber, and Trebonius. Brutus is on the fence, but they convince him to enter into the plot. At that point, he becomes the leader of the group. He decides they don't need to include Cicero because "he will never follow anything /...

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The conspirators are Cassius, Casca, Cinna, Decius, Metellus Cimber, and Trebonius. Brutus is on the fence, but they convince him to enter into the plot. At that point, he becomes the leader of the group. He decides they don't need to include Cicero because "he will never follow anything / That other men begin.” Brutus also persuades the others that they don't need to murder Mark Antony, which in retrospect is a mistake. Caius Ligarius is then brought into the conspiracy.

Decius says he will flatter Caesar into coming to the Senate. He is able to reinterpret Calpurnia's dream to make it look like a positive, not a negative, omen, giving credence to Cicero's earlier words that omens can be made to fit the needs of the interpreter.

As the suspense and foreboding grow, Decius and Caesar arrive at the Senate. There, it seems people might know of the plot, so the conspirators move quickly. Decius prevents Artemidorus from giving Caesar a letter exposing the plot. Trebonius draws Antony away from the scene. The other conspirators surround Caesar. Pretending they are petitioning Caesar to undo Publius Cimber's banishment, they move in closer and closer. Casca stabs him first and Brutus last.

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First, they plan to have Decius go to Caesar's house to make sure he goes to the meeting. It's a good thing they decided to do this because Calpurnia almost has Caesar convinced to stay home, but Decius appeals to his vanity by telling him that people will say he is ruled by a woman's fears and by telling him that the senate plans to ask him to be king (see Act II, scene 2).

Second, once Caesar arrives at the meeting place, the conspirators surround him so that no one can warn him of what is to come or protect him when it happens. They make sure Antony is not around when they do the deed (Act III, scene 1).

Then they have Metellus ask for a pardon for his brother, who has been banished from Rome. That is their pretense for showing Caesar's unreasonableness and tyranny. When some pretend to bow to him, Casca raises his dagger and says, "Speak, hands, for me!" And they all proceed to stab him to death, proclaiming that they have done a good deed for Rome and its citizens.

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