In "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" by William Wordsworth, what figurative language like metaphors, similes, imagery, allusions, personification, and symbols are used?

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In the poem “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth, the speaker walks through nature. Encountering flowers on his way, he cannot help but feel joyful: “a poet could not but be gay, in such a jocund company.”

The first personification in this poem is...

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In the poem “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth, the speaker walks through nature. Encountering flowers on his way, he cannot help but feel joyful: “a poet could not but be gay, in such a jocund company.”

The first personification in this poem is the personification of a cloud, as the speaker states that he “wandered lonely as a cloud.” The fact that the poet uses the expression “wandered” shows the reader that the cloud has been personified. This choice of words implies the cloud has the freedom to decide where it is wandering to, and the freedom to decide at which speed, just like a person would have.

Furthermore, the cloud could also be interpreted as a metaphor for the speaker’s life; he wanders through life “as a cloud,” thus moving from place to place and discovering various things during his journey.

The cloud is also used as a simile in this poem: the poet only refers to one cloud – this illustrates a feeling of loneliness, just like the speaker is walking by himself, the cloud is wandering on its own, too.

The daffodils are another instance where the poet uses a simile, as they are described as “continuous as the stars that shine.” This allows the poet to paint a better picture of the vast amount of flowers he has seen on his walk – to him, the amount of flowers is just as endless as the night-time sky.

The daffodils are also described as if they were human: the poet sees them in a “crowd” and they are described as “dancing in the breeze.” This personification is then also taken up again in the last two lines of the poem, and this time even extend to the speaker’s heart itself, which “with pleasure fills, and dances with the daffodils.” Through the use of personification, by raising nature to human level, the poet successfully attempts to strike a connection between nature and humans and shows how closely linked they are.

Through the imagery in this poem, the poet tries to share his sensations and feelings with the reader, as it allows the reader to see and visualise better what the poet is trying to describe. The speaker feels at one with nature, he finds solace in nature, and therefore he wants the reader to experience this feeling, too.

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