Hamlet Questions and Answers
by William Shakespeare

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In Hamlet, in Gertrude’s room, Hamlet stabs Polonius through the arras, thinking that it is Claudius. Why in this moment does Hamlet act quickly, without the hesitation that has otherwise plagued him? If Hamlet had stopped to think before acting, he would have realized that it was illogical for him to believe it was Claudius behind the arras. Why is this?

In Hamlet, Hamlet acts quickly, without the hesitation that has plagued him because he's in an agitated state due to his violent argument with Gertrude. Hamlets stabs what he thinks is Claudius because his emotions have got the better of him. If Hamlet had stopped to think before acting, he would've realized that it was illogical for him to believe that it was Claudius behind the arras, because Claudius always gets other people to do his dirty work for him.

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Ever since Hamlet found out that it was Claudius who murdered his father, old King Hamlet, he's vowed to exact a bloody revenge upon him. Yet at each and every turn he has procrastinated, seemingly unable to break out of his self-induced torpor and carry out his original plans. Hamlet's main trouble is that he thinks too much; instead of just getting on with killing Claudius, he spends what seems like an eternity brooding about it. The more he thinks, the less likely he is to act.

So it's rather surprising to see Hamlet lash out at poor old

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