In George Orwell's 1984, how does Julia explain the Party's sexual puritanism?

Julia explains the Party's sexual puritanism as representing the Party’s need for total control and, even more, its intended use of sexual privation to induce hysteria. The latter is crucial, because it could be transformed into war fever and worship of a leader.

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In 1984, Julia’s hatred of the Party is played out through her commitment to undermining its rules, because she sees open rebellion as futile. These attitudes support her engaging in clandestine sexual activity. The narrator states that for Julia, “everything always came back to her own sexuality.” (Part 2, chapter 3). She explains to Winston that sexual puritanism serves the Party’s interests in several ways. One important aspect is the Party’s need to exert total control over everyone. What is more important, she maintains, is that the Party understands the application of sexual energy into other domains. The hysteria induced by sexual privation is needed for generating “war fever and leader worship.”

Julia says that the human instinct for sex generates “a world of its own.” The existence of a world beyond its control is unacceptable to the Party and so must be destroyed. However, control is not the central issue. The idea of using the energy that would go into sex is more important. Making love not only uses energy, she states, it also makes people happy and apathetic. All these effects are undesirable. The Party is only interested in things that increase people’s commitment to the Party and its causes. Energy should be directed to the war-related, Party-sponsored activities such as marching, cheering, and flag-waving. Julia declares those activities “sex gone sour” and calls Big Brother “bloody rot.”

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Unlike Winston, Julia fully grasps the Party's agenda regarding sexual puritanism and displays her acute awareness of the subject by explaining to Winston how the Party suppresses citizens' sexual desires to create an atmosphere of hysteria directed towards the Party's political opponents. Julia explains to Winston that the Party wants the populace full of energy at all times and believes that if Party members are sexually satisfied, they will lose their motivation to work or engage in community functions that benefit the government's agenda. Julia tells Winston,

If you’re happy inside yourself, why should you get excited about Big Brother and the Three-Year Plans and the Two Minutes Hate and all the rest of their bloody rot? (167)

Essentially, Julia understands that the Party purposely bottles up its members' sexual impulses and directs their repressed emotions towards Oceania's enemies, effectively creating a hysterical environment. Repressed sexual impulses manifest as rage and anger, which the Party cleverly steers towards its political opponents during required activities like the Two Minutes Hate. The Party also understands that satisfying sexual relations can lead to alliances and destabilize their regime.

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Julia acknowledges in a conversation with Winston that sexual behavior creates a private world between two people, one that lies outside of the Party's control and is therefore abjectly forbidden. However, therein lies only part of the reason for the puritanical behavior required among the proles. More important, she explains, is the Party's need to create a fervent "hysteria" among the populace that can be translated into worshiping and warmongering.

During sexual relations, according to Julia, people use up valuable energy and are left in a lazy state of euphoria afterwards. Big Brother can't have that, as it needs the proles energetic all the time so that they may emphatically endorse, enforce, and maintain state priorities. Julia makes it more visual when she states, "All this marching up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour." In other words, those controlling society are repressing and bottling the populace's sexual impulses through prohibition and instead directing that energy into state-sanctioned activities.

As such, Julia is fine simply outwitting the Party by engaging in secretive, self-indulgent behavior, while Winston will only be satisfied with a widespread rebellion intent on eliminating the system of controls, including sexual puritanism.

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Julia understands the Party's sexual puritanism as springing from more than just a desire on the part of the government to crush any vestige of life of outside of Party control. That might be one element behind the drive towards puritanism, but Julia intuitively grasps that the Party also wants to keep people (Party members that is: the government doesn't much care what the proles do) in what she calls a state of "hysteria" that is produced by sexual deprivation. The government's goal is to capture the Party members' pent up sexual energy and channel it into a lust for war ("war-fever") and worship of the Party leader. Julia intuits that a sexually satisfied and happy population is less likely to be riveted the Party and its activities. Julia explains her theory as follows:

When you make love you’re using up energy; and afterwards you feel happy and don’t give a damn for anything. They can’t bear you to feel like that. They want you to be bursting with energy all the time. All this marching up and down and cheering and waving flags is simply sex gone sour. If you’re happy inside yourself, why should you get excited about Big Brother and the Three-Year Plans and the Two Minutes Hate and all the rest of their bloody rot?’

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