In "Games at Twilight," do you think that Ravi's "sense of insignificance" at the end of the story will remain strong?

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The short story "Games at Twilight" by Anita Desai tells of a group of Indian children who pester their mother to let them play outside despite the lingering late afternoon heat. She finally relents, and they begin a game of hide and seek. An older, stronger boy named Raghu becomes "it" and has to search for the other children. A smaller, younger boy named Ravi overcomes his fear of the darkness and pests such as rats, spiders, and ants, and slips into a storage shed to hide. While he waits alone in the dusty darkness, he imagines himself a hero for besting Raghu and winning the game.

Ravi remains in the shed until twilight. He comes out and runs to the safe spot on the veranda, only to find that the children have long ago abandoned the hide and seek game and have gone on to do other things without him. In fact, they have forgotten about him completely. His daydreams about heroically winning the game have come to nothing. In his chagrin he refuses to play with the children. Desai writes...

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