In Frankenstein, how does the monster show emotion, observe it, or communicate it? I am trying to argue why the Monster is human.

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The Monster displays considerable emotion—namely anger—when he demands that Frankenstein make him a wife. Although there's something appropriately monstrous about the way he makes his demands—with threats and menace—the motivation behind the Monster's request is recognizably human all the same. Like most human beings, the Monster doesn't want to be alone; he seeks a soulmate, someone with whom he can spend the rest of his life. If this doesn't necessarily make the Monster human, it does make him human-like, so much more than just an animated collection of body parts.

Frankenstein's taken aback by the Monster's demands. He never would've thought in a million years that his diabolical creation would ever have developed anything like an emotional life; that simply wasn't part of his grand vision. The very idea that his Monster wants a mate is simply too horrible to contemplate. The Monster's becoming more human, and that means becoming more...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 486 words.)

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