Frankenstein Questions and Answers
by Mary Shelley

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In "Frankenstein," how does Robert Walton feel about his guest?

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Kale Emmerich eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Initially, Walton is saddened and in despair because of his loneliness. On his voyage, he has, as he says "no friend," no one to be a companion and share in his pursuit. He feels the men of his crew are not scientific in their pursuits and he has no one who really understands him.

Upon meeting Victor, he is shocked that he will not immediately come aboard, but quickly grows to appreciate the man and be fond of him. He finds, in Victor, a kindred spirit—a scientist at any cost, it seems. He hears Victor's story of pursuing science to its terrible end and is disappointed that Victor was weak and let emotions end his experimentation.

In the end, however, Victor's words of caution change Walton's mind and soften him, saving the lives of the men of his crew. Walton is grateful in the end because he has truly found a friend.

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Just before Robert Walton meets Victor, he has written his sister about the need for a friend. He writes his sister:

"I have no...

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