In Fahrenheit 451, where did Montag hide his books after the ladies left?

When Montag reads the forbidden poetry to Mildred's friends, he realizes pretty quickly that he has made a huge mistake. Fearing that Mildred will burn the books, he stashes them in the backyard, away from his home.

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In part two of Fahrenheit 451 , Mildred's friends Mrs. Phelps and Mrs. Bowles come to Montag's house to watch the White Clown. Montag, ignoring Faber urging him to stay calm and not do anything through his earpiece, unplugs the television and tries to talk to the women about the...

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In part two of Fahrenheit 451, Mildred's friends Mrs. Phelps and Mrs. Bowles come to Montag's house to watch the White Clown. Montag, ignoring Faber urging him to stay calm and not do anything through his earpiece, unplugs the television and tries to talk to the women about the oncoming war. They seem utterly indifferent to the conflict and Mrs. Phelps even says that if her husband is killed, she will simply marry again.

Enraged, Montag gets a book of poetry from the over room and reads "Dover Beach" by Matthew Arnold aloud, even though Faber begs him not to. Mrs. Phelps bursts into tears, and Mrs. Bowles berates Montag for forcing them to endure the poem. This part of the scene suggests that poetry forces the women to face the reality of their lives. When they no longer have television, pills, or fast cars to distract themselves, they must face their internal sadness. Montag burns the book and then scolds Mrs. Bowles, reminding her of everything sad in her life that she refuses to acknowledge.

Mildred goes to her bedroom to take sleeping pills and Montag realizes that his books are in danger. Montag has begun to wonder if the women are really wrong for hiding from sadness and anguish, indicating that he might not be totally sold on the idea of rebelling just yet. He finds the books where Mildred had put them, behind their refrigerator, and hides them in the backyard to keep Mildred from burning them. It seems here that Montag has made the decision to protect the books at all costs.

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After Montag reads Matthew Arnold's poem "Dover Beach" to his wife Mildred, Mrs. Phelps and Mrs. Bowles, he realizes that in his need to force the women into thoughtful dialogue, he has given Mildred even more cause to destroy the books that Montag values. He hides his books in his backyard, hoping that removing them from the home he shares with his book-burning wife will ensure their safety.

The poem upsets Mrs. Phelps, proving that words and literature do indeed have power to inspire emotion, and Mrs. Bowles responds to this show of emotion negatively, blaming poetry and deriding it. Montag's aggressive reaction to Mrs. Bowles distresses Mildred, perhaps because Montag has not only treated her friends badly, he has shown himself to be an unconventional thinker in a world full of convention. Montag's realization at this time that Mildred has been destroying his books motivates him to take them out of the house.

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In Part II of Ray Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451, Guy Montag recklessly reads banned poetry to his wife’s friends. While Faber listens to the conversation through an earpiece, Montag spiritedly shows Mildred’s friends his forbidden collection of books and begins to read poetry. When Faber urgently raises the obvious dangers of such a move, Montag barks that he wants to,

Scare hell out of them, that's what, scare the living daylights out!

Montag’s reading of “Dover Beach” seems to have the opposite effect. Mrs. Phelps, Mrs. Bowles, and Mildred all react with tears of anger and pain. The women seem to feel genuine anguish as they experience emotions brought on by the reading of the poetry. They depart flustered and it seems obvious that they plan to report Montag to the authorities. Mildred tosses some of Montag’s books in the incinerator.

Knowing his position is tenuous, Montag rushes to collect and retrieve his books. He finds them hidden all around the house and a particularly large stack “behind the refrigerator.” Montag then,

…carried the books into the backyard and hid them in the bushes near the alley fence. For tonight only, he thought, in case she decides to do any more burning.

Montag’s home is burned by the fireman later that night and the books are lost.

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Montag, a fireman charged with the responsibility of burning books, was convicted by Clarisse’s probing to question the purpose of his job. In his quest to learn more about what books contain and establish the genesis of book burning, he stole several books the first of which he hid under his pillow as he and Mildred slept on separate beds. Afterwards, he hid the rest of the collection in the ventilator grill. One day Mildred’s friends come over to Montag’s house to chat and watch their usual shows and Montag, angered by their superficiality, switches off the walls and reads them poetry by Mathew Arnold. This angers and saddens them and they are forced to leave. After this Montag realizes he has made a mistake and goes for his book collection in the ventilator grill and "He carried the books into the backyard and hid them in the bushes near the alley fence."

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Montag realized he had made a mistake in reading the poetry to the ladies.  Faber emphasized the point when he said into the earpiece,

"Fool, Montag, fool,fool. oh God you silly fool..." (pg 101)

Montag finds his books hidden behind the refrigerator.  Mildred, in fear of losing her home, his job, and her life as she knows it, hid them and was burning them one by one. Montag realizes that he has to move them if he wants to save them.  He moves them into the backyard and hides them in the bushes near the alley fence.  He just plans on leaving them there for the one night in case she decides to do any more burning. He has to go to work.  Remember, all of their fires were at night.

Ironically, that very night they stopped and burned his house, and it was his wife and her friends who reported him to the fire dept. He never gets to retrieve the books.

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