In Eyes on the Prize episode VI, who is making demands on the system? Describe the different groups active in the Civil Rights movement. How are their perspectives about how to achieve their goals different?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Episode VI of the documentary Eyes on the Prize is about the demand for African American voting rights in Alabama in 1965. Although the Civil Rights Act had been passed in 1964, the local authorities in Alabama were still resisting calls for black suffrage (or the right to vote).

The...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Episode VI of the documentary Eyes on the Prize is about the demand for African American voting rights in Alabama in 1965. Although the Civil Rights Act had been passed in 1964, the local authorities in Alabama were still resisting calls for black suffrage (or the right to vote).

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), led by Dr. Martin Luther King and others, organized a march from Selma to Montgomery, the capital of Alabama, to publicize their call for African Americans to be registered to vote. Their tactics were non-violent in nature. Governor Wallace of Alabama opposed this march, and when the first march began, the marchers were attacked by policemen. A second march was called off shortly after it had begun, and the third march went forward after President Johnson sent troops to protect the protestors.

There were several different coalitions in these marches. While the SCLC supported the marches, the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, did not take part in the marches because they disagreed with the SCLC about tactics to achieve African American voting rights. The local white Alabama leadership, including local sheriff Jim Clark and Alabama governor George Wallace, opposed the marches. National leadership in Washington, including Lyndon Johnson, supported the protests. The events in Selma helped lead to the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team