In Dracula, why does Harker seem relieved that the Count must have been in a hurry when he put him to bed and undressed him?

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Harker records that he was glad Count Dracula was in a hurry when he put him in bed and undressed him because that meant he didn't find Harker's diary, which was hidden in his pants pocket. If the count had, he would have destroyed it or taken it from him,...

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Harker records that he was glad Count Dracula was in a hurry when he put him in bed and undressed him because that meant he didn't find Harker's diary, which was hidden in his pants pocket. If the count had, he would have destroyed it or taken it from him, and this is a record of all the strange and ominous events going on that Harker does not want to lose.

Harker is badly frightened by this time in his stay at Dracula's castle. He has been accosted by three tall women who seemed not to cast shadows but who leaned over him to kiss him and were ready to bite his neck. It was at this point that the angry Count Dracula appeared and swept the woman away. He told them they were forbidden to touch Harker, taking Harker, who had passed out, back to his room.

Harker is very well aware that much is amiss, including that the three women are waiting to drink his blood. He is very curious about the room at the top of the stairs where the women were staying and tries to reenter it, only to find it locked from the inside. He knows at this point he needs to find a way to flee the castle.

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